Lee Center for Advanced Networking
The Edward S. Harkness Professor of Economics and Political Science
MS 228-77, California Institute of Technology
Pasadena, CA 91125

B.S., Production Management, Oklahoma State University, 1961; M.S., Economics, Oklahoma State University, 1964; Ph.D., Economics, University of Virginia, 1965.

cplott@hss.caltech.edu
http://www.hss.caltech.edu/people/faculty/plott_charles_r

Dr. Plott’s research is in laboratory experimental methods and developing technology for economic exchange and trading processes. His Caltech laboratory has been a major producer of technologies used in laboratory experimental methods beginning with the development of powerful local area networked tools to conduct experiments and, more recently, used for the development of internet technology for conducting large, worldwide experiments. Much of his research has been devoted to exploring how laboratory experimental methods might be applied to complex policy issues. He was the first to apply modern laboratory methods to policy issues including regulation, deregulation, and antitrust. In this capacity, he has contributed to the solution of problems of allocating landing rights at the major airports. He worked on policies for the allocation of resources on Space Station Freedom, the markets for emissions permits in Southern California (RECLAIM), and mechanisms for pricing the use of natural gas pipelines. Recent research has focused on such diverse problems as the auctioning of the right to use railroad tracks, markets for electric power in California, and the design and implementation of the auction used by the Federal Communications Commission for the sale of Personal Communications Systems licenses.

Professor Plott has received the Université Pierre Mendès France diplôme Docteur honoris causa, in 1996, Purdue University Doctor of Letters honoris causa, in 1995. He has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1985. He was an Econometric Society Fellow, 1985, Guggenheim Fellow, 1981–1982, and a Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences Fellow, 1981–1982.